Injections FAQ » Humulin N » Novolin Humulin

Novolin Humulin

A: Both are human derevatives. They are just different brands.

Q: difference between humulin n and novolin n?
my boyfriend has been a diabetic since seven years old. He has always used humulin n and r insulin injetctions up until the last month. He has had been changed to novolin n and r, and feels his body is not reacting in a positive way to the change. I need to know if there are any differences between the two insulins that can cause his body to react to any changes in the insulin.

A: My understanding is that they are essentially identical and that little to no changes should be required. Is there a reason he’s still on novolin as opposed to the newer insulins Humalog or Novolog? They are much faster-acting and effective than the older insulins. Much closer to how human insulin works. Have him ask his doc about it. It’s more expensive, but most insurances cover it well now.

Q: Switching from Novolin to Humulin?
Is it safe to switch from Novolin NPH to Humulin N? Are they identical products?

A: I have done just that several months ago. However, it was the reverse direction – from Humulin to Novolin. I found that after using both I preferred the Novolin over the Humulin because the Humulin lasted about two hours (really) and the Novolin lasted three hours. I was on Humulin for about a year and never experienced the insulin action longer than two hours! It is suppose to last for about 5 hours. However, experience told me time and again that it worked only for two hours and crashed. Having to change to Novolin was the best for me because – after a month – I knew it was working better than the Humulin. For me, it was working consistently for three hours. At the two hour point I would test my BG and it would be fine. However, after a couple of days – at the start of the switchover – I discovered there was a 10 percent difference between my two hour reading and my three hour reading. Now, after about nine months on Novolin, I won’t go back – it’s that much of a difference in my readings.

If you must change, check it out for yourself and see if there’s any difference in your readings.

Good luck.

Q: Humulin and Novolin insulin?
what is the difference between huulin 70/30 and novolin 70/30 insulin and can novulin be used in place of humulin?

A: Humulin 70/30– begins working within thirty minutes and reaches its peak between two and four hours after injection. Humulin will last between 14 and 24 hours.

Novolin 70/30 – begins working within thirty minutes and reaches its peak between two and 12 hours. Novolin lasts up to 24 hours.

Novolog 70/30 – begins working with just ten to 20 minutes after injection and reaches its peak at around one to four hours. Novolog will last up to 24 hours.

Humulin 50/50 – begins working within thirty minutes and reaches its peak at around two to five hours. Humulin may last between 18 and 24 hours.

Humalog mix 75/25 – begins working at around 15 minutes and reaches its peak between 30 minutes and two and a half hours. Humolog generally lasts between 16 and 20 hours.

Q: is there a difference between INSULINS (short acting) Novolin R, Humulin R and insulin, regular?
Just curious if there is a difference and if so what is it?
im not taking insulin by the way. I am studying pharmacology for Rn school. The instructors have asked us to study insulin over the holidays and get ready to be tested in January. In our book it shows insulin short acting and insulin Reg with the name Novolin R and Humulin R. Just trying to differentiate.

A: Like Regular, Humalog and Novolog are used to cover meals and snacks. Most meals raise the blood sugar for only 2 to 3 hours afterwards. Once injected, Regular insulin takes 30 minutes to begin working, peaks between 2 and 4 hours and hangs on for 6 to 8 hours, long after the meal stopped raising the blood sugar. Humalog and Novolog, on the other hand, begin working in about 10 minutes, peaks at one to one and a half hours and are gone in about three and a half to four hours.

Many people who’ve tried these faster insulins report that their control is improved and that they feel better. The great advantage of fast insulins are that they match the “action time” for most meals. You can take them as you begin eating, rather than the 30 to 45 minutes prior to eating required of Regular. No longer do you need to accurately anticipate when you (or your young child with diabetes) will begin eating. In addition, Humalog and Novolog leave your body faster so you don’t have residual insulin causing low blood sugars in the late afternoon or, even worse, in the middle of the night.

For most meals, fast insulins will be lowering the blood sugar at the same time the food is raising it. The rise in the blood sugar seen in the couple of hours after eating is much lower, especially with Novolog, and by the end of three hours the blood sugar is often back to its starting point.

With Humalog or Novolog, you’re better equipped to prevent spiking blood sugar between meals, while avoiding the lows that result from the combined buildup of Regular and long-acting insulins. The new Lantus insulin is an excellent choice when using these fast insulins to cover meals. The clearly defined action times for the fast insulins makes it easier to correctly adjust meal doses.

Humalog and Novolog are also excellent insulins to use to lower high blood sugars. Their faster action means that less time is spent at high blood sugar levels, and there will be less residual insulin triggering low blood sugars later.

Humalog is produced by Lilly and was first released in the U.S. in 1996, while Novolog is made by Novo Nordisk and was released in 2001. Both insulins offer quicker action time than the original “short-acting” Regular insulin, which first became available in 1921. However, users also report significant differences in activity between each of the three insulins. Let’s first look at these differences.

Q: Please help me solve this with work shown?
In 2004 the Diabetic Express charged $27.06 for a vial of Humulin insulin and $34.39 for a vial of Novolin Velosulin insulin. If a total of $1565.57 was collected for 50 vials of insulin, how many vials of each type were sold?

A: 29 vials of Novolin Velosulin and 21 of Humulin

Q: 2 questions about Insulin for Diabetics?
1) A diabetes poster that I am studying says Regular insulin (Humulin R, Novolin R) and intermediate acting insuline (Humulin N, Novolin N) are OTC (Over the Counter). Could this be a typo???
I thought all insulins are obtained by Rx (prescriptions) here in the United States of America.

2) The poster also goes on to say that the usual daily dose of insulin for Type 1 DM is calculated as: 0.7-2.5 unit/kg/day
But I thought I learned in school the daily dose of insulin for Type 1 DM is: 0.5-0.6 unit/kg/day.
HOWEVER, for Type 2 DM, it is: 0.7-2.5 unit/kg/day
So, which is right?

Someone please get back at me. Thank u!

A: I have to have prescriptions for all of my insulin. And as far as dosage, every person’s disease is different. How much insulin a person has to take depends on their personal needs. I know people with type 2 that take 100 units of Levimir every night and day time insulin that is adjusted by what and how much they eat. Others that I know take only 20 units a night and none during the day. So, I think the poster is all messed up.

Q: Insulin brand difference?
For a year now I have been using Humulin N (cloudy) and Humilin R (clear) mixed in into one syringe. Yesterday I surprising ran out of N, and since it was really short notice I couldnt get any more shipped to me from my prescriber right away. So I went to a local pharmacy and they gave me Novolin N. I used to use Novolin back in the day, but with Novolin R. Now I need to know if its okay to use Novolin N and Humulin R mixed together until I get more Humulin N. Like is there any difference between the two brands besides just brand names? All I know is when looking at the new bottle of Novolin N and an old empty bottle of Humilin N, they both say “NPH, human insulin (rDNA origin), isophane suspension” somewhere on the bottle. Although that makes them seem like the exact same thing, I need to be sure that they will work the same.
If anyone can help me thank you so much!

A: Chemically, there is no difference between the two. When used properly, both will give you excellent results.

But you should call the pharmacy (or your doctor) to see if maybe the DOSE needs to be differnet, due to different concentrations if drug uin the bottle.

In the mean time, keep a CLOSE watch on your blood sugar levels! Don;t let them get too high or too low.

Q: Please help me solve this problem?
In 2004, the Diabetic Express charged $27.06 for a vial of Humulin insulin and $34.39 for a vial of Novolin Velosulin insulin. If a total of $1565.57 was collected for 50 vials fo insulin, how many vials of each type were sold?

A: 27.06a + 34.39b = 1565.57
a + b = 50.

Solving the system of equation, we get that a = 21 and b = 29.

-John

Q: please help me solve this equation?
Sales of Pharmaceuticals. In 2004, the Diabetic Express charged $27.06 for a vial
of Humulin insulin and $34.39 for a vial of Novolin Velosulin insulin. If a total of $1565.57
was collected for 50 vials of insulin, how many vials of each type were sold?

A: Let number of vial of Humulin insulin be x
and number of vial of Novolin Velosulin insulin be y.

x + y =50 ———–First Equation

27.06x + 34.39y=1565.57——Second Equation

Solve these pair of linear equations.

Q: A few MULTIPLE CHOICE questions from my Pharmacy Tech Course…PLEASE HELP :( ?
1) Which of the following are two commercially available IV fat emulsions?
a) Humulin R and Novolin R
b) Intralipids and Liposyn II
c) Mutamycin and Mithracin
d) RenAmin and NephrAmine

2)Which of the following is NOT needed on a pharmcay label for a finished IV admixture?
a) Patient name and room number
b) Date and time the admixture was made
c) Ingredients, concentrations, and final amount of solution
d) Equipment used in preparing the admixture

3) Large volumes of IV solution may be easily transferred into a(n)
a) ampule or vial
b) premixed piggyback
c) evacuated container
d) prefilled syringe

4) Chemotherapy agents are also known as
a) antineoplastics
b) opthalmics
c) total parental nutrition solutions
d) 3-in-1 products

5) Which of the following is an electrolyte?
a) Folic acid
b) intravenous emulsion
c) potassium chloride
d) Vitamin C

Thanks in advance ….
@daddyryx- THANK YOU!!!!!! :)

i think im gonna put the rest of my questions up too now lol

A: 1 B, 2 D, 3 C, 4 A

5 is ambiguous. It technically has 2 answers. The one they are looking for is C, however, Vitamin C is also an electrolyte (ascorbic acid). All acids are also electrolytes.

Now, that wasn’t too hard, was it?

Q: I need help with this math problem please!!?
Sales of Pharmaceuticals. In 2004, the Diabetic Express

charged $27.06 for a vial of Humulin insulin and $34.39

for a vial of Novolin Velosulin insulin. If a total of

$1565.57 was collected for 50 vials of insulin, how

many vials of each type were sold?

A: let h = the number of vials of Humulin and n = the number of vials of Novolin
h + n = 50
h*27.06 + n*34.39 = 1565.57
rearrange the first equation in terms of h
h = 50 – n
substitute this value of h in the second equation
(50-n)*27.06 + n*34.39 = 1565.57
1353 – 27.06n + 34.39n = 1565.57
subtract 1353 from each side and combine the n’s
7.33n = 212.57
divide each side by 7.33
n = 29
so h = 50 – 29 = 21

check the answer
29*34.39 + 21*27.06 = 997.31 + 568.26 = 1565.57 check!

Q: More Systems of Inequalities HELP!!! ?
In 2004, the Diabetic Express charged $27.06 for a vial of Humulin insulin and $34.39 for a vial of Novolin Velosulin insulin. If a total of $1565.57 was collected for 50 vials of insulin, how many vials of each type were sold?

A: You will have to divide 1565.57 by 34.39. And than you will get the answer.

Q: Algebra Homework Help!!?
Sales of Pharmaceuticals. In 2004, the Diabetic Express
charged $27.06 for a vial of Humulin insulin and $34.39
for a vial of Novolin Velosulin insulin. If a total of
$1565.57 was collected for 50 vials of insulin, how
many vials of each type were sold?

A: Let x be number of vials of Humulin;
y be number of vials of Novolin. Then

x+y=50
27.06x+34.39y=1565.57

Multiplying first equation by 27.06 and subtracting gives
7.33y=212.57
=>y=29
=>x=21

So there were 21 vials of Humulin and 29 vials of Novolin sold.

Q: I will choose best answer and award 10 points to anyone that can help me with all of these question.?
1. How does the author determine what the first equation should be for examples 2, 3, and 4?
2. How does the author determine what the second equation should be for examples 2, 3, and 4?
3. How are these examples similar?
4. How are they different?

2). Retail Sales. Mountainside Fleece sold
40 neckwarmers. Solid-color neckwarmers sold for
$9.90 each and print ones sold for $12.75 each. In all,
$421.65 was taken in for the neckwarmers. How many
of each type were sold?

3).Sales of Pharmaceuticals. In 2004, the Diabetic Express
charged $27.06 for a vial of Humulin insulin and $34.39
for a vial of Novolin Velosulin insulin. If a total of
$1565.57 was collected for 50 vials of insulin, how
many vials of each type were sold?

4).Fundraising. The St. Mark’s Community Barbecue
served 250 dinners. A child’s plate cost $3.50 and
an adult’s plate cost $7.00. A total of $1347.50 was
collected. How many of each type of plate
was served?

A: Turtle……………

=D

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