Injections FAQ » Novolog » Novolog Pen

Novolog Pen

A: What??
Your Dr. does not know how much insulin to give you?!

Time for a new Dr. !
;)
Nobody on this web-site should even begin to tell you how much insulin to take, it could be fatal!

Q: Is NovoLog® insulin available in calgary canada?
Novolog® Flexpen® – A prefilled and disposable insulin pen. Our convenient insulin pen is easy to learn and easy to use. Is NovoLog® insulin available in calgary canada?

A: emmi zairish,
To the best of my knowledge, this is not available in Canada. If you live in Canada, you would need to enquire from the manufacturer if the item is prohibited or if you may obtain it by ordering / private purchase. (I have reason to believe that there is a 5-pen package). If, on the other hand you are visiting Canada for a period of time, you should be able to take the necessary medication with you. You should check with the authorities before travelling, if this is allowed.

ALL ANSWERS SHOULD BE THOROUGHLY RESEARCHED, IN ANY FORUM AND ESPECIALLY IN THIS ONE. – MANY ANSWERS ARE FLAWED.

The information provided here should not be used during any medical emergency or for the diagnosis or treatment of any medical condition. A licensed physician should be consulted for diagnosis and treatment of any and all medical conditions.

Hope this helps
matador 89

Q: difference between insulin types when priming pen needles?
Ok…when I prime my pen needles with two units, the novolog shoots across the room, while the lantus just has a couple of drips. The needles are the same length and I’m priming with the same amount. What’s the difference in how much comes out of the needle?

A: You might have faulty pens. To test this, take the pen, screw on a pen needle, take off the outer and inner cap, and then reattach the big clear plastic outer cap. Hold the pen so that the needle is facing absolutely downward, and dial to 20 units. If the amount doesn’t come exactly to the top of the small tube (the part right before the cap widens for the base of the needle) then you’ve got yourself a faulty pen.

If it does, I wouldn’t worry about it.

Q: Insulin pump verses Insulin pens?
I am a type 2 diabetic and have been for 11 years. Currently I am on two insulin pens. Novolog flex pen and Lantus solostar along with metformin for every day control of my diabetes. Lately my endocrinologist and I have been talking about getting an insulin pump to better manage by diabetes. So my questions are — what do you prefer, your pump or daily injections? Which have you had better control with? Did your insurance cover your insulin pump? (Mine will after deductible co-pay in which I only have 90.00 to meet) AND what is your monthly set up costs for your pumps supplies verses insulin pens and supplies? My doctor is suggesting a Medtronic Paradigm pump. ANY information, suggestions and comments are welcomed. The person who has the most information I am looking for will be chosen as best answer :)

A: I have been using the Minimed 722 for 3 months, after using novolog and lantus pens for a little over a year after being diagnosed with type 1. I love using the pump because it is much more convenient. I also had a lot more hypo’s on pens than i do now on the pump.

When you switch to a pump, you will use only novolog, because instead of having one dose of basal insulin (lantus), the pump will give you a basal rate much more similar to a working pancreas. You will most likely still use metformin after switching.

I have Medica insurance, and it covered my pump, as well as my supplies, but compared to the cost of using pens, the supplies are about 2x’s more, but with the added control you get from a pump, you could avoid the costly complications that you might encounter using pens.

Also, here is a great website to get in contact with other diabetics (types 1 and 2) that are on pumps, specifically the minimed pumps.

http://www.tudiabetes.org/group/minimedparadigmusers

Q: Dripping from insulin pens?
I use the Lantus Solostar and Novolog Flexpens, and I’ve noticed that both pens drip a couple of times after i use them. Is this normal? Thanks!!
I keep the pen in for at least 5 seconds and sometimes even pump in but it still drips. I also get blood if I keep it in for too long.

A: It is a minute amount that drips off the needle, but if you keep it in for two or three seconds after pressing the button down it will reduce it.

Q: Has anyone almost died from diabetic ketoacidosis?
I just came home from the Intensive Care Unit at hospital. I’m newly diagnosed diabetic and I thought I had the flu. I kept thinking it would go away after a couple of days. Originally I took one shot of lantus at bedtime and tested once in the morning. Now I am so confused. I now have been given a endocrinologist but I can’t see for a week. I know the lantus pen does not need to be refrigerated after opening. How about novolog? Always keep it in frig? Anyone ever have to use K-phos? It seems dangerous but obviously not as much as DKA. I live by myself and am afraid if I have a low in my sleep I won’t wake up. I couldn’t keep anything down me so I thought if I gave myself insulin I would go low, NOT wow I almost died. Just so confused and scared about everything now. I didn’t realize when diabetic is sick sugar goes through the roof. Thank you anyone who replies fellow diabetics. Wow this disease sucks!

A: No, but I thought I was dying from lactic acidosis after taking Metformin for several years.

If you’re type two, job one should be to get off the meds with proper diet and exercise. If you’re type one, I’m very sorry for you and I would recommend following Allie Beatty’s blog linked in my profile.

Can’t help you with the insulin thing. It’s been my life’s goal to stay as far away from injections as I can. My mother (also a type two) didn’t have the luxury of the Internet to help her get off the meds. She listened to her idiot doctors and was on insulin in a few years. I was not so unfortunate, I have the luxury of the Internet, and with lots of research, plenty of effort, and lots of trial and error, I have found that type two diabetes does not have to be all that bad. In fact, I consider it a wake up call and am actually thriving now. Much like I was twenty years ago… long before being diagnosed.

Q: My insulin has changed color..?
Ok, so I’m 15, a type 1 diabetic of 3 years, and today at school i noticed that my insulin (Novolog) was tinted orange… I was confused at first, and i just thought it was the lighting in the bathroom. So i did the shot and went on with my day. When i got home, i checked my blood sugar and it was normal. Then i grabbed the insulin pen, and looked at it again. This time, i knew for sure that, my insulin is now tinted orange. I switched the insulin out with new insulin. I just want to know, is it still safe to use? What could of caused the color change? The only reason i am really asking is because it was a 3/4 full cartridge, and insulin costs money, lol. Thanks.
I use Novolog Penfills.

A: Part of official information about taking Insulin:
=================================
Insulin aspart should be thin, clear, and colorless. Do not use the medication if it has changed colors or has any particles in it. Call your doctor for a new prescription.

http://www.prescription-drug-24.com/insulin.html

Check Expiration date of your Insulin.

Q: Will I have to change my insulin if I move abroad?
I currently have a basal/bolus of novorapid(novolog) and levemir using insulin pens. If I were to go abroad, would I be forced to change from using my pens to an insulin pump, or to change the short acting/long acting regime?
I meant a perminant move from the UK to the USA. Sorry for the ambiguity.

I was just wondering if, say, I got health insurance (which I don’t have in England as the NHS is free), would I be encouraged to/forced to change insulin or the method of administration?

My control’s generally pretty good and my last hba1c was 6.

A: That’s it, give all the relevant information, such as which country you’re moving to. How can anyone say, with any degree of certainty, if whichever country uses, or has stocks of a particular insulin, if you don’t let us know which country you’re talking of?

Of the two insulins that you’ve mentioned, they both seem to be commonly available in the majority of countries around the world. There should be no reason for you to be “forced” to change your regimen, though some doctors may believe that other insulins, and ways of administering it, may prove more beneficial to you.

Edit:

Hi, shine_lil_dandelion.

Please forgive my unsolicited narkiness. I’m afraid I got tied up with responding to questions about computers where people weren’t even giving details of specific pieces of hardware that they wanted drivers for, etc.

Thank you for your additional information.

It would be almost a necessity for you to take out insurance if you did move to America. Care and treatment costs for some long-term conditions, of which diabetes is one, are phenomenal. You may well find that even with insurance there will be considerable ‘out of pocket’ expenses. As I’m sure you’ll already appreciate, health care works totally differently in the United States compared to the UK. Almost everything you’ll need for your diabetes care will need to be paid for.

Both types of insulin that you mentioned in your original question are readily available in the United States, but I will reiterate what I said earlier, that some doctors may believe that newer drugs may aid you in your diabetes care better. It’s highly doubtful that you will be placed under undue pressure to make changes to your current regime.

If you do decide to go to America, may I wish you the very best of luck.

Best of luck to you.

Q: ??? about used insulin pens?
I am using the Novolog Flexpen. When it’s empty can I just through it away or does it need to go in a biohazard box?

A: I’ve been told the flexpens can be thrown away with the normal household rubbish, just make sure the last needle is removed. Only the needles need to go into the biohazard or sharps box.

Q: Is NovoLog® insulin available in calgary canada?
Novolog® Flexpen® – A prefilled and disposable insulin pen. Our convenient insulin pen is easy to learn and easy to use. Is NovoLog® insulin available in calgary canada?

A: To be totally sure, i would call a drug store like shoppers drug mart and ask the pharmacy. They will be able to tell you if you can get it in calgary or if not, somewhere else.

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